Categories
Focus and Productivity Tactical

How to write a million words – on a slacker’s schedule.

An inside look at my daily schedule. Plus, powerful tools and strategies to help you become more focused and productive.

Writing
Writing in the Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam airport.

Here’s something most people (including some my friends and family) don’t know: Over the past 5 years, I’ve written over one million words.

ONE MILLION.

That’s everything from books, articles, sales pages, coaching curriculum, marketing plans, and more. (I spent the last 5 years as a marketing strategist for Precision Nutrition.)

In a minute, I’ll deconstruct my schedule and share how I did this—including a simple tool I  use every day to stay focused.

But first, an explanation:

The reason most of my readers haven’t seen most of these million words is simple: 90% of them exist behind the scenes in various products and educational courses.

Or they were ghost-written for other people, which means I wrote the first draft but often gave someone else the byline; something I was happy to do to help PN grow its revenue and influence.

People tend to have the same reaction when they learn how much I’ve written. They say something like, “One million words? You must have been so busy and overwhelmed.”

My answer: Rarely.

First, writing one million words seems like a lot…but when you look at the math, it’s totally reasonable.

365 days per year – 105 days (weekends) – 30 days (vacation) = 230 workdays per year.

230 workdays x 5 years = 1150 days of total work.

1,000,000 words / 1150 workdays = an average of 870 words per workday.

I averaged 870 words per workday.

It’s simply an example of consistency and practice.

Second, I’ve always thought of myself as a “productive slacker”.

Although there are some exceptions, I tend to work for about 5 hours per day, starting around 9AM and stopping around 3:00PM (with an hour or so for lunch). The rest of the time, I hang out, read, go out for drinks, meet people for dinner, listen to music, explore, or simply sit and stare into space.

In other words, I tend to strike a good balance between my work and the rest of my life. The only caveat: the 5 hours I work are focused. Like ridiculously focused.

Focus and productivity are things lots of my readers struggle with. I know because I hear from them daily:

John coaching email
A recent email (shared with his permission, of course).

But here’s something almost no one ever talks about: Being productive isn’t a matter of having the right tools or technology.

Instead, the ability to focus and produce at a high-level are both skills you must build.

I had to learn this fast.

At 22, along with running my personal training studio, I was also writing for major magazines under tight deadlines and negotiating a book deal.

If I didn’t get my shit together, I didn’t make money and I didn’t eat food.

Even then, I’d occasionally drop the ball or get in over my head, and my mom would have to bring me care packages of food and toilet paper.

Nat Green, Men's Fitness
Oh, young Nate. You are so naive. And what’s up with that hair?

But over time, I learned how to work.

I learned how to be incredibly productive on a day-to-day level. And I learned how to decide which projects and opportunities were worth my time, and which ones I should avoid or abandon. (That’s something I’ll write more about soon, if you’re interested.)

The world’s simplest (and most powerful) productivity tool

One habit I’ve followed for the past 8 years or so is planning my day on a simple notecard. It looks like this:

Notecard
Notecard, circa 2014

This habit is so ingrained in me that I often forget it’s weird until someone else points it out. Now, the notecard may not look like much…but it’s incredibly powerful and multi-layered.

That’s why I want to to spend the rest of this article deconstructing what’s on it.

I want to show you 1) how I think through my day and 2) how you can increase your focus and find more balance in your own life.

(And then I want to give you a free mini-book my friend Jason wrote recently.)

One quick note before we dig in: It took me years of work to have a schedule like this. Plus I don’t have any kids or dependents to take care of. So don’t feel discouraged if you’re schedule looks wildly different than mine.

You can still become more focused and productive by implementing just ONE idea from this and practicing it consistently.

Deconstructing my daily notecard

Notecard

“Thursday”

I have a notecard like this for every single day (even the days where I’m not working or creating). I like to know where my time goes and how I’d ideally like to spend it.

On the surface, it can seem too restrictive, but I’ve found planning in this way allows me to affect the quality of my day. (To steal a line from Thoreau.) In other words, I know what’s expected of me every day and what I’d like to do.

I don’t always stick to it 100%, but I’ve gotten closer with practice.

“Morning – Meditate, coffee + grateful

I front load my morning with stuff that’s good for me. These are things I’d likely forget to do (or choose not to do) later in the day.

I meditate for 20 minutes every morning, sometimes using Headspace, sometimes using Sam Harris’s guided meditation, and other times just sitting there in silence. And I wrote about my coffee and grateful exercise (and how it improved my relationship) here.

protein shake + tea”

I’m usually very excited to start working, so I try to eat a fast breakfast so I don’t have to cook. (I prefer cooking at night.)

Before I started traveling and living out of a bag, I had this protein shake every morning:

  • 1 frozen banana
  • 1 scoop vanilla protein
  • 2 handfuls of spinach (you can’t taste it)
  • 1 heaping tablespoon of peanut butter
  • 1 cup unsweetened hemp or almond milk

Now I usually eat a couple of hard-boiled eggs (cooked the night before) or fast until lunch.

Focus – Outline 1st draft of men’s sales p(age).

I try to only work on one thing per day, and I try to make it The Most Important Thing.

How do you decide what that most important thing is? Well, that’s a whole skill in and of itself, but I will say you can usually get close by asking yourself a version of the following:

What ONE thing can I do today that will make the biggest impact for me and my business?

On this particular notecard, my Most Important Thing was outlining the men’s coaching sales page for Precision Nutrition. (No sales page, no clients.)

Of course, the Most Important Thing will change depending on what project you’re working on. (For instance, my Most Important Thing today was writing this for you.)

WB 1 – 90m

“WB” stands for “work block.” “90m” stand for 90 minutes.

I do one completely focused block of work for 90 minutes with absolutely no distraction. That means no email, no phone, no social media, no interruptions, no nothing. The only thing I do is set a timer, sit my ass in a chair, and work (and maybe stand to stretch a couple of times).

The first 15 minutes are usually hell (sometimes the first 30). But by minute 35, I’ve usually hit my stride. After my 90 minutes are up, I grab a peppermint tea and do some light stretching. And then I’m right back to it.

WB2 – 90m

My second work block is usually a little easier since I’ve already built momentum.

Lunch

I tend to eat lunch out so I can completely disconnect from my computer and whatever I’m working on. Takes me about an hour.

WB3 – 90m

This is often my final work block for the day (unless I’m really cranking or under a very tight deadline). The third work block is kind of a crapshoot; sometimes it’s good and easy, and sometimes it’s absolute slog and I hate my life.

30m email

This is when I allow myself to go on the internet for the first time.

I start with my email and try to get back to as many people as I can. Then I check social media (which I hardly update since it’s rarely a priority.) And then I’ll send any articles I want to read directly to my Kindle so I can read them later when I’m off my computer.

After my 30 minutes are up, I write down my next day’s notecard and completely shut down my computer. That means I’m done with work for the day. (99% of the time, I don’t open my laptop again after this.)

EFL @4

EFL stands for Elemental Fitness Lab which is where I trained while I was living in Portland. I find it helpful to have a “hard stop” for when I finish my work, and heading to EFL to meet up with Chris and Blaine always gave me a reason to get out of work-mode.

EFL

Pok-Pok @7

After I exercise, I head home to shower and either stay in and cook dinner with Richelle, or go out to meet friends. Pok Pok is one of my favorite restaurants in Portland.

(Notice how I try to “bookend” important personal things at the beginning and end of my day.)

How to find more focus – a few suggestions on where to start.

So that’s my notecard and how I generally structure my day. But like I said earlier, becoming focused and productive are skills that take practice and consistency to build.

To help you get started, I have a few suggestions depending on your situation.

What to do if…

…you have “too many ideas” and don’t know where to start. Get into the habit of asking: “What ONE thing can I do today that will make the biggest impact for me and my business?” Do that thing (and only that thing) and see how you feel.

…you have trouble finding balance. Front-load one or two important personal things into your day (exercise, meditation, spending time to eat breakfast with your family) before you officially start working. Also, give yourself a “hard stop” for when you’ll transition out of work mode. I recommend setting an appointment with someone to have drinks, work out, or another activity. Once that activity is over do not go back to work again.

…you struggle with procrastination and self-control. Remove distractions and the need to have self control by turning off your internet connection, leaving your phone in a different room, and/or setting up a website blocking tool like Freedom (which is what I personally use). Also, set a timer and race the clock. (I use Pocket Cup Noodle Timer.)

…you want to learn more about becoming focused and productive. My friend Jason wrote a an 18-page mini-book with 5 proven strategies to help you get focused, do work you’re proud of, and make more time for the things that really matter. You can download it for free here.

The ability to focus is a rare and valuable skill.

As Cal Newport often writes, it’s a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. It’s effectively a superpower. 

And I believe it’s a superpower you must build if you want to find more balance in your life and do work that’s both meaningful and rewarding.

To build this skill will take time, hard work, and the ability to consistently push through discomfort.

But it will pay you back a million times and more. 

– Nate

PS – If you’re interested, here are roughly 75,000 (about 8% of my output over 5 years) of some of my favorite words that you can find for free online.

Categories
Essay General Life Skills Tactical

My 2016 Personal Retrospective (And 2017 Action Plan)

A one-hour exercise to help you celebrate your biggest wins, identify your biggest opportunities, and dominate the new year.

Nathan Anderson
Sometimes it’s nice to think about how small you are, and how everything you’re worried about right now probably doesn’t matter.

I spend most of my time planning for the future. With the help of my meditation practice, I’m getting better at living more in the present. But something I still find incredibly difficult is reflecting on the past.

I rarely celebrate achievements for more than a few minutes, and I almost never “look back” on projects or situations to identify what I learned. (And I certainly don’t use that information to guide my future decisions.)

This, as you can imagine, is a problem.

“Those who don’t learn from the past are doomed to repeat it.”

Sometimes being “doomed to repeat” stuff can be a good thing. I think I did a lot of things right this year, and I’d like to continue to do them.

But I also did a lot of stuff wrong.

If we don’t learn from our past, we we won’t be able to identify our biggest opportunities to make life better. Which means we’ll likely suffer through the same situations and thought-patterns again and again.

So this year, I’m continuing with a new tradition I started last year: a personal retrospective.

(Read my 2015 retrospective here.)

What’s a retrospective?

A retrospective is when you look back on past events to identify what worked…and what didn’t work. A retrospective helps you celebrate your wins and identify your weaknesses. It helps you learn from the past and correct for the future.

How to do your own personal retrospective

To do a personal retrospective, you simply pick a particular project or time period and ask yourself the following questions:

  • What’s working? (“What did I do right? What am I proud of?”)
  • What’s not working? (“What could be improved? What are my biggest opportunities for growth?”)
  • How can I fix what’s not working for a better result? (“What specific things can I focus on next time?”)

Then you spend 15-30 minutes writing about each.

Nate’s 2016 Personal Retrospective

To give you an idea of how it’s done—and to encourage you to do the same—I want to share mine with you.

NGE 2
Talking with a Buddhist monk in Thailand; taking a selfie with friends; hanging out in a Slovenian gym; taking in a gorgeous mountain view.

QUESTION 1: WHAT’S WORKING? (“WHAT DID I DO RIGHT? WHAT AM I PROUD OF?”)

If I had to give 2016 a title, I’d call it “The year of gaining perspective.”

Big Win #1: I lived out of a suitcase for seven months and traveled to Mexico, Thailand, Vietnam, England, Croatia, Slovenia, and Italy. (And Canada, but who counts that?)

Traveling like this taught me a few important things:

  • I have all that I need to be happy. It may sound trite, but it’s true. I have hot water, a comfortable place to sleep, enough food to eat, full functionality of all my limbs, a good group of friends, a family I love, and I don’t live below the poverty line. (Fun fact: If you’re single, live in the US, and make $50,000 gross per year, you’re in richest 1.3% of the world’s population.) Traveling is the ultimate perspective-giver.
  • Everyone is seeking connection and potential friends are everywhere. Wherever Richelle and I went, we had people to hang out with and new things to try. We made friends with a young group of entrepreneurs in Playa Del Carmen; we ate strange noodle desserts with the owner of a a coffee shop in Chiang Mai; I nearly got myself killed while riding on the back of a scooter in Vietnam (on my way to a karaoke bar no less); and we had one of the best meals of our lives at Hisa Franko in Slovenia, thanks to Luka and Matej.
  • If you’re creative, you can get (or stay) in shape anywhere. I lifted water jugs in Mèrida, did handstands on a rooftop in Bangkok, hiked in the Julian Alps, played frisbee in Danang, and hit up an old school gym in Croatia. (The guy behind the counter was named Goran, which means “mountain man” in Kurdish. He looked the part.)
  • Long-term travel isn’t for me. After seven months on the road, we were ready to come back to the States. We missed our families, our community, and our basic routines. We’ll continue to travel, of course, but we’ll likely do it for a few weeks at a time (at most) and turn it into a full-fledged vacation instead of a “workcation”.

Big Win #2: I maintained my key habits and adopted a couple new ones.

  • Old habits I stuck to 90+% of the time: Meditating in the morning for 20 minutes; doing a daily gratitude practice with Richelle; exercising a minimum of two times per week; doing undistracted creative work for at least four hours per day; taking weekends completely off.
  • New habits I adopted: Giving 5-10% of my income to charity; cutting my meat consumption in half.

Big Win #3: I did work I was proud of.

  • From January to November I sent an average of three newsletters per month. (I took the month of December 2016 off completely.)
  • I advised a handful of companies that are doing great work in the world.

What We've Learned

Click here (or the image above) to download the book for free.

QUESTION #2: WHAT’S NOT  WORKING? (“WHAT COULD BE IMPROVED? WHAT ARE MY BIGGEST OPPORTUNITIES FOR GROWTH?”)

Big Growth Opportunity #1: Continue to work on flexibility and mobility (for real this time).

Big Growth Opportunity #2: Spend at least 50% of my creative time on my own projects.

If you read my 2015 retrospective, you’ll notice that Number 1 is a carryover from last year.

Here’s what I said then:

I’ve paid lip-service to flexibility for the past couple of years, half-heartedly following a daily stretching routine. But honestly, I still tend to skip a good part of my warm-up and “forget” to stretch at least half the time.

Because of that, I often wake up tight and sore and often require a hot shower to “loosen up.”

Well, a full year has passed and I’m disappointed to report that not much has changed. Old habits die hard, apparently.

One potential reason for the fuck-up: I gave myself way too many (four) action steps last year. Here’s what I said I’d do at the beginning of last year:

Action step #1: Do my morning mobility and activation warm-up at least 80% of the time. That means I can only miss one day out of the week.

Action step #2: Follow a simple 5-minute mobility, stretching circuit before bed every night.

Action step #3: Set a timer for 60 minutes and do one stretch for one minute for every hour that I work at my computer.

Action step #4: Sit on the ground for at least 10 minutes and play with positions till they become more comfortable.

That’s WAY too much.

After watching thousands of people go through the habit-based coaching programs at Precision Nutrition, I know that most of us can only stick to one new habit at a time. (Sometimes you can get away with two, but it helps to have those habits in different domains—like one for personal and one for professional.)

So this year, even though I have a lot more to work on (trust me) I’m going to narrow my focus to these two things, plus reduce my action steps.

Both of these opportunities—increasing mobility and working on my own projects 50% of the time—will have a significant positive impact in my life. Probably more than any other habit I could adopt.

In other words, if everything else about my life stayed the same and only these two things changed, I’d consider 2017 a huge success.

QUESTION #3: HOW CAN I FIX WHAT’S NOT WORKING FOR A BETTER RESULT? (“WHAT SPECIFIC THINGS CAN I FOCUS ON NEXT TIME?”)

Action step #1: Set a timer for 20 minutes of stretching, breathing, and movement directly after I finish my morning meditation.

Rationale: I’m already meditating in the morning, so I might as well use that to my advantage. By linking this new practice (stretching) to my old practice (meditating), I’m more likely to stick to it. And the fact that I’m already wearing sweat pants and sitting on the floor helps.

Also, for someone who loves routines, I hate following rigid programs. That’s why I’m purposefully keeping the stretching and movement portion of this action step vague. My only goal is to set a timer for 20 minutes and do some kind of movement for the entire duration. If I can do that, I’ll consider it a win.

Nate Green Morning Workout Routine
I figure I can crawl, stretch, and do some other bodyweight exercises for 20 minutes and feel pretty good about it.

Action step #2: Immediately fire 1-2 companies I’m currently working with in order to free up 50% of my work schedule. 

Rationale: The way my schedule is structured right now, I’m spending 90% of my time on other people’s projects. This has been fun and lucrative, but it’s not allowing me time to work on stuff that matters to me: writing blog posts and books, creating new projects, and working with personal coaching clients.

I’ll likely take a significant financial hit in the short-term, but that’s no big deal. Best case scenario: I use that free time to create things that help people and earn money directly. Worst-case scenario: I try it for a year and pick up another corporate client or two in 2018 if needed.

Write your own Personal Retrospective

So that’s mine. Now it’s your turn.

It’ll take you roughly an hour, but it could be the most important thing you do this year. After all, 2017 is already here.

What are you the most proud of? Where are your biggest growth opportunities?

And the biggest question: What are you going to do about them?

-Nate

Categories
Life Skills Tactical

Nate Green’s 2015 Retrospective (And 2016 Action Plan)

A one-hour exercise to help you celebrate your biggest wins, identify your biggest opportunities, and prepare to dominate the upcoming year.

Greg Rakozy

I spend most of my time planning for the future. With the help of my meditation practice, I’m getting better at living more in the present. But something I still find incredibly difficult is reflecting on the past.

I rarely celebrate achievements for more than a few minutes, and I almost never “look back” on projects or situations to identify what I learned. (And I certainly don’t use that information to guide my future decisions.)

This, as you can imagine, is a problem.

“Those who don’t learn from the past are doomed to repeat it.”

Sometimes being “doomed to repeat” stuff can be a good thing. I think I did a lot of things right this year, and I’d like to continue to do them.

But I also did a lot of stuff wrong.

If we don’t learn from our past, we we won’t be able to identify our biggest opportunities to make life better. Which means we’ll likely suffer through the same situations and thought-patterns again and again.

So this year, I’m beginning a new tradition I hope to repeat every year: A Personal Retrospective.

What’s a retrospective?

A retrospective is when you look back on past events to identify what worked…and what didn’t work. A retrospective helps you celebrate your wins and identify your weaknesses. It helps you learn from the past and correct for the future.

I was first introduced to this framework by Phil Caravaggio, the CEO of Precision Nutrition. Because of him, PN does a retrospective at the end of every single project.

We’ve found it invaluable for the business, and I expect to get similar results with my Personal Retrospective.

How to do your own Personal Retrospective

To do a Personal Retrospective, you simply pick a particular project or time period and ask yourself the following questions:

  • What’s working? (“What did I do right? What am I proud of?”)
  • What’s not working? (“What could be improved? What are my biggest opportunities for growth?”)
  • How can I fix what’s not working for a better result? (“What specific things can I focus on next time?”)

Then you spend 15-30 minutes writing about each.

Nate’s 2015 Personal Retrospective

To give you an idea of how it’s done—and to encourage you to do the same—I want to share mine with you.

If I had to give 2015 a title, I’d call it “The year of getting out of my comfort zone, seeing the ‘The Big Picture’, and refocusing.”

Big Win #1: I did more public speaking and repeatedly faced my irrational fear of talking in front of large groups.

I gave four talks this year, and each one taught me something profound.

  1. The Toastmasters “Ice Breaker” speech: Everyone feels at least a little nervous getting in front of a crowd of strangers and talking. Speaking at Toastmasters helped me boost my confidence and practice my speeches in a very low-risk arena where I didn’t know anyone.
  2. The 3-hour focus and productivity workshop: Small groups are where I thrive. I felt engaged and enjoyed the ability to switch gears and tailor my material to the needs of the group. I felt like I made a genuine impact on each person.
  3. The fitness conference: I don’t feel as natural on stage, but I know it’s a skill that can be refined with more practice. My slides were on point, people laughed at my stories, and a few later told me how much it helped them. That’s all I can ask for.
  4. The eulogy: This was incredibly difficult. My good friend Kyle Hibler died this year at the age of 31 when he was hit by a car while walking to work. His death reminded me of how suddenly life can go away. Unlike my other talks, I didn’t feel an ounce of nervousness while giving Kyle’s eulogy. There was simply no room for it.
Me, Jason, and Kyle in 2002.

Big Win #2: I did work I was proud of.

  • I wrote a half-dozen newsletters, a couple blog posts, and an 8-part series on relationships. (It starts with the most embarrassing story I’ve ever published and ends with a little redemption and hope.)

  • I coached a few guys online and helped them get out of their rut, find a new direction with their business, and bring more balance back to their lives. This was incredibly rewarding work, and I’m thinking about doing more personal coaching in 2016.

“Working with Nate is like sitting in a coffee shop talking to a good friend, but instead of chatting about what you did last Friday night, you’re plotting a plan for domination.” Eric W, a guy I worked with this year.

  • And at Precision Nutrition, I contributed to some big, influential projects that will go on to help thousands of people. I’m incredibly proud of the work I’ve done there.

Big Win #3: I took steps toward gaining even more freedom and autonomy. Plus, I set the stage to do even more personally meaningful work in 2016.

Richelle and I stayed debt free, contributed a good chunk of money to our “freedom fund”, and put most of our stuff in storage before setting off to travel.

We left Portland, spent two months back home in Montana, then traveled to Merida and Playa del Carmen, Mexico, where we’re currently enjoying the beach. From here, we’re heading to Southeast Asia, then on to Europe. Or wherever.

Agave fields in Mexico.

I also made a few difficult yet calculated decisions that I believe will allow me to do even more personally-meaningful work in 2016. But more on that later.

Question #2: What’s not  working? (“What could be improved? What are my biggest opportunities for growth?”)

Big Growth Opportunity #1: Continue to work on communication skills, especially reacting emotionally during charged conversations.

Anyone who knows me knows that I’m very candid. That means I say what I think and share my feelings—oftentimes without thinking critically about what I’m about to say. Since I tend to hash out ideas verbally, I actually “think” while talking.

Because of my gregariousness, I can sometimes come off as brash and emotionally-reactive, which understandably makes some people uncomfortable.

“Venting” on an idea may help me formulate my thoughts, but it’s not necessarily an effective way to communicate all the time.

While I’ve trained myself to notice it either while I’m doing it or shortly after the interaction is over, I have yet to discover how to notice the urge to “vent” before it happens.

Big Growth Opportunity #2: Continue to work on flexibility and mobility.

When I don’t have a chair, I find it very hard to sit still for longer than a minute or two. (If you want to make me miserable just ask me to sit on the floor.)

I’ve paid lip-service to flexibility for the past couple of years, half-heartedly following a daily stretching routine. But honestly, I still tend to skip a good part of my warm-up and “forget” to stretch at least half the time.

Because of that, I often wake up tight and sore and often require a hot shower to “loosen up.”

Question #3: How can I fix what’s not working for a better result? (“What specific things can I focus on next time?”)

If I had to “80/20” the stuff I should work on — the stuff that will help me suffer less and become more effective in 2016 — my biggest opportunities are fixing my communication skills and becoming more flexible. (While maintaining my already-established good habits, of course).

I’ll likely talk to people and move my body around for the rest of my life—so it makes sense for me to focus on these weaker areas.

“In your professional life, it’s better to focus on your strengths. But in your personal life, it’s better to improve your weaknesses.” Phil Caravaggio

Below is how I plan on tackling them right off the bat, though I’m sure my specific action steps will change and transform throughout the year.

How I plan to become a better communicator.

Action step #1: Read the book Crucial Conversations, take notes, then perform an 80/20 analysis on my notes to identify the top 1-2 habits I should work on first.

Action step #2: In the meantime, I’m going to work on not interrupting people during conversations. When I notice the urge to speak, I will take a breath, continue to listen, and try to hear exactly what is being said before asking a question or beginning to talk.

How I plan to increase my flexibility.

I’ll do the following in PN-style fashion: pick one thing and focus on it completely for 2-4 weeks before moving on to the next action step.

Action step #1: Do my morning mobility and activation warm-up at least 80% of the time. That means I can only miss one day out of the week.

Action step #2: Follow a simple 5-minute mobility, stretching circuit before bed every night.

Action step #3: Set a timer for 60 minutes and do one stretch for one minute for every hour that I work at my computer.

Action step #4: Sit on the ground for at least 10 minutes and play with positions till they become more comfortable.

Write your own Personal Retrospective

So that’s mine. Now it’s your turn.

It’ll take you roughly an hour, but it could be the most important thing you do this year. After all, 2015 is almost over and  the new year will be here in a week.

What are you the most proud of? Where are your biggest growth opportunities?

And the biggest question: What are you going to do about them?

-Nate

PS – Here are a couple random things I think you’ll enjoy:

What I read to become a better public speaker:

A video of my friend Kyle sticking his head in a toilet after losing a bet. The guy was hilarious and would do anything for a laugh.

And finally, I’m going to be doing a LOT more projects, writing, and personal coaching in 2016. I’m very excited about this—and I hope you are, too.

Thanks, as always, for reading,

-Nate